Beaujolais Nouveau, il est la!

Beaujolais Nouveau 2013

Like many people, I suppose, I had long been dismissive about the wines of Beaujolais. That was until I tasted Jean Foillard’s magnificent Morgon Côte du Py a few years ago...It completely changed my perspective on the possibilities for honest, authentic and even fine wines from this region. Foillard may be one of the avant-garde, but there are other, perhaps less vaunted, producers who are producing Gamay that, without the artifices of excessive intervention in both the vineyard and the cellar, are alive with juicy freshness and a real joie de vivre.

 Gilles and Cècile Roux and Didier Desvignes are but two of these producers and their wines have been especially blessed by several exceptionally good recent vintages. I am looking forward to tasting the 2013, which by all accounts, has been made by glorious September weather. We have ordered a small quantity of their Beaujolais Nouveau which gives us a fun excuse to pre-taste the new vintage! As I say, quantities are quite small, so don't delay!

Claire O'Boyle-Gallagher, Le Caveau

Gilles et Cécile Roux, Domaine de la Plaigne - Beaujolais Villages Nouveau 2013

A chance to get an insight into the 2013 vintage from Gilles and Cécile Roux, who are based in Regnié-Durette. Cécile Roux, just this week told us that they were happy with how the vintage went with a glorious unbroken run of sunshine in September resulting in fully ripe grapes. The fermentation cellar, she said, has been heady with the aromas of sweet red fruits and that unmistakeable smell of newly fermented grape juice and smells heavenly!

Didier Desvignes, Beaujolais-Villages Nouveau 'Nature' 2013 Organic viticulture, wild yeasts only (and certainly no 71B!), no chaptalisation, no added sulphur Didier Desvignes is one of a number of small, artisan growers whose dynamism and vision are driving the new quality focus of Beaujolais wines. The best producers of this region are now producing some of the most delicious, food-friendly and under-priced wines in France- no 'goût de banane' here! These light-bodied wines have crunchy raspberry and sour-cherry fruit flavours, soft tannins and fresh acidity. This kind of structure means that they can be drunk slightly cool and complement a wide variety of foods: white or red  meats, charcuterie, soft cheeses.
Pascal Rossignol

Leave a comment